Dear Janis Message Board
Sign up Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 31      Prev   1   2   3   4   5   6   Next   »
Clee

Registered:
Posts: 193
Reply with quote  #31 

Janis,

 

On your post about developing diabetes causing weight gain.....are there any articles on this.  I would love to read about it.  It sounds interesting.  My maternal grandmother and two uncles had/have diabetes.  So, I suppose I received the trait and now have it.  I have always been in control of my weight.  But when I had surgery(TABH),  a few months afterward, I found out that I have it. I am no hormone therapy.   At any rate, I still feel like I have done something wrong along the way that caused me to have this disease. 

 

My mother and other siblings (two sisters) think the same,  even though they have not said so exactly.  They say things such as "you need to lose a little bit of weight or you should lose the tummy and then you'll be okay".  I haven't even told them that I'm on Lantus even though I've been on it for almost two years.  It make me so angry because they simply don't understand.  I just feel it's none of their business if that's the way they feel.  I don't want them to tell me what I WANT to hear, but I do want them to support me in a positive manner..  It makes me crazy not knowing.

 

Anyway, I just would like to have something that will possibly let me know what I've done wrong.  I'm not having one of those moments to where I'm going into a pitty party.  I would just like to find something that says, this is possible and begin a search into it possibly not being my fault for this.  I know....  I know....everybody, including my doctor says it's not my fault.  But how is it that a person can be active (I exercised all the time and ate very healthful) get this even if it DOES run in the family....?

 

Anyway, if you have any resources that can point me in the direction of researching this, I'd really be happy.....  I think it would make for interesting reading.  Thanks.

 

Clee  

Janis

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,276
Reply with quote  #32 

 

From the American Diabetes Assn website:

 

Q: I watch what I eat and I exercise, but I can't seem to knock off the pounds. Is there some other connection between being overweight and having diabetes? I have had type 2 diabetes for at least 15 years and take insulin and rosiglitazone (Avandia).

A: Statistics show that at least 80 percent of those with type 2 diabetes are obese. How are diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease connected?

The amount of weight gained varies greatly from person to person and is dependent, to a large degree, on the choices people make regarding the food they eat and the amount of exercise they get. However, insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes may be associated with weight gain, probably due in part to the effect excess insulin has on turning glucose into glycogen and fat.

Drugs such as rosiglitazone (Avandia) or pioglitazone (Actos) are associated with weight gain. They interact with a receptor on fibrous tissue that may convert it into fat cells, though how this occurs is not yet well understood.

Improved CV Function


At the same time, this class of drugs has demonstrated highly positive effects on our cardiovascular health. Despite the weight gain, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone also cause metabolic changes that are associated with improved cardiovascular function. These beneficial changes include lower blood pressure and a more favorable blood lipid (cholesterol and triglycerides) profile. It is generally accepted that the use of metformin with insulin may lessen weight gain.

Among people with type 1 diabetes, weight gain is greatest among those who use insulin as a "carbohydrate credit card," instead of balancing carbohydrate intake with exercise. Most studies of "tight control" in type 1 diabetes have shown metabolic changes associated with improved cardiovascular function, despite varying degrees of weight gain.

The major immediate goal of diabetes care is to control blood glucose, and then to deal with any associated weight gain. But how can you tell if you've gained too much weight?

The Waist Test


Just measure your waist. A value greater than 40 inches in men or 35 inches in women is associated with a substantially increased risk of health complications related to obesity.

How should one deal with weight gain, whether due to eating too much and lack of exercise, or to vigorous attempts at tight control? A diet that is low in simple carbohydrates and saturated fats with adequate fiber, along with regular physical exercise, will help control weight gain and the risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

The most important thing when it comes to managing obesity and diabetes is to start taking control through diet and exercise and to follow the health care regimen recommended by your health care team. Focus on the things you can control with food and exercise and on achieving the best overall health regimen for your diabetes today.



Sheldon H. Gottlieb, MD, FACC, is a cardiologist at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, in Baltimore, Md. He also directs the Diabetes-Heart Failure Program at Johns Hopkins HealthCare, LLC.


__________________
Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Follow me on twitter: @dearjanis
pastormathkat

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clee

I still feel like I have done something wrong along the way that caused me to have this disease. 

 

My mother and other siblings (two sisters) think the same,  even though they have not said so exactly.  They say things such as "you need to lose a little bit of weight or you should lose the tummy and then you'll be okay". 

 

I would just like to find something that says, this is possible and begin a search into it possibly not being my fault for this.  I know....  I know....everybody, including my doctor says it's not my fault.  But how is it that a person can be active (I exercised all the time and ate very healthful) get this even if it DOES run in the family....?

 

 

The words of your post really drew me.  I am so tired of feeling like I caused myself to be diabetic.  My dad is diabetic, and I've found that many of his cousins also are.  But I can't help but feel that I made myself have this by being "the fat one." 

 

Most of the commercials and articles out there now for the general public just reinforce the idea that "if you would just stop being fat, you wouldn't have diabetes."  Whenever I tell people that I am diabetic, I feel like they are saying to themselves, "Yeah, and if you weren't so fat, you wouldn't have gotten it."

 

While I applaud the media for trying to teach people about diabetes and to help people become more aware, I just really feel like the information out there blames people for getting it.

 

Does anyone else feel this way?  Or am I just weird?


__________________
--Kathy :)
Janis

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,276
Reply with quote  #34 

Hi Kathy,

The majority of people with type 2 feel exactly as you do.  They are constantly told that if because they are overweight, they caused themselves to develop diabetes.  NOT TRUE!  It is not your fault.  Being overweight and inactive can trigger the development of type 2 diabetes in some folks, but what about those who develop it and are NOT overweight or inactive.  A few months ago, I interviewed Kendall Simmons of the Pittsburgh Steelers.  He is pure muscle and in superb physical shape.  Yet...he developed type 2 diabetes.  Sorry, you didn't cause it.  Don't beat yourself up over it. There is a lot you can do to control it, but we really don't know the exact cause. 

Janis


__________________
Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Follow me on twitter: @dearjanis
pastormathkat

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #35 

Thanks for the encouragement.  I know in my MIND that it's not my fault, especially after seeing how many of my dad's cousins have it.  But it's hard not to blame myself.


__________________
--Kathy :)
sharon

Registered:
Posts: 7,051
Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janis

Hi Kathy,

The majority of people with type 2 feel exactly as you do.  They are constantly told that if because they are overweight, they caused themselves to develop diabetes.  NOT TRUE!  It is not your fault.  Being overweight and inactive can trigger the development of type 2 diabetes in some folks, but what about those who develop it and are NOT overweight or inactive.  A few months ago, I interviewed Kendall Simmons of the Pittsburgh Steelers.  He is pure muscle and in superb physical shape.  Yet...he developed type 2 diabetes.  Sorry, you didn't cause it.  Don't beat yourself up over it. There is a lot you can do to control it, but we really don't know the exact cause. 

Janis

  Hey - after reading these particular posts, I suddenly realized that I was also blaming myself for having diabetes.  Neither of my parents had it and, as far as I know nobody in the extended family on either side had it either.  One thing that does puzzle me is when you look at a list of people at risk, overweight or obesity, as well as other situations, are in that list.  But being overweight is one of the risks.  When Margaret came to talk to our ladies group at church, she was talking about who was at risk, as I actually spoke up and said nobody in my family had it, but LOOK AT ME - overweight.  So I guess I did blame myself, because I was overweight that I did it to myself.  But no, like you said, we don't know what CAUSES it, but being overweight is being at risk, but not necessarily the cause.     

      Oh,   by the way, my mother-in-law never tells me I can't have a piece of cake anymore.  Not that I have it around, but if we are someplace together, she doesn't say anything anymore. 

      And, Larry did go for another A1c test and he called the dr. today and his bs was 102 and his A1c was 55.3 - so no diabetes.  And Larry is overweight and his parents were both "borderline" - and this might be an aniquated term. anyway, he doesn't have it.  Now his chol., etc., that is another story. 

    But I guess I can stop blaming myself and just take care of myself like I am doing, finally in the last year.  Only took 20 years.  LUM

CLINK! CLINK! CLINK!  FUN AND LAUGHTER - Sharon

 

 


__________________
Sharon from Arizona
Pumping with humalog since August, 2009
cornwoman

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 727
Reply with quote  #37 
I, too, feel like it's my fault. I know in my head that it's not, because my educator told me that it wasn't my fault. But that's not what it feels like, and my hubby...and my guess is others...firmly believe that being overweight is what caused me to have it....because that's what they read and what they hear when told that overweight is a risk factor. My mother is hypoglycemic, which my educator says is where I got it from. I guess that I just need to get that message to move the foot or two down from my head to my heart.....


__________________
CLINK - CLINK - CLANK - CLANK!!!

Mary in AZ --- EL4
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
If things get better with age, then I must be MAGNIFICENT!!
pastormathkat

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #38 

It's good to know that I am not alone in my feelings.  Thanks, everyone, for sharing.  It's good to know that we can support each other.


__________________
--Kathy :)
sharon

Registered:
Posts: 7,051
Reply with quote  #39 

                     AMEN!!!  LUM

 

CLINK! CLINK! CLINK!   FUN AND LAUGHTER - Sharon


__________________
Sharon from Arizona
Pumping with humalog since August, 2009
Janis

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,276
Reply with quote  #40 

YOUR DIABETES IS NOT YOUR FAULT!  You are all perfect!!!!!!

Janis


__________________
Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Follow me on twitter: @dearjanis
cornwoman

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 727
Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janis
YOUR DIABETES IS NOT YOUR FAULT!  You are all perfect!!!!!!
Janis


Thank you Janis!

__________________
CLINK - CLINK - CLANK - CLANK!!!

Mary in AZ --- EL4
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
If things get better with age, then I must be MAGNIFICENT!!
sharon

Registered:
Posts: 7,051
Reply with quote  #42 

 Hey Janis, have you seen anything about the new General Foods Int'l. coffees?  Margaret brought single pkgs. to support group this past Tues.  I think I had the Vanilla Creme - it was very good.  It is supposed to be sugar free and caffeine free.  Also got a coupon with it.  Just wondered if you had seen this?  LUM  FUN AND LAUGHTER - Sharon


__________________
Sharon from Arizona
Pumping with humalog since August, 2009
Janis

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,276
Reply with quote  #43 

I haven't seen them, but they sound YUM, YUM, YUM!

Janis


__________________
Janis Roszler, MSFT, RD, CDE, LD/N
Follow me on twitter: @dearjanis
Red

Registered:
Posts: 2,376
Reply with quote  #44 

 Janis with the interview with Kris Freeman.  You did an excellent job young lady.  BUT, testing on back of finger....ouch, I do the sides.  and CLINK - Paula 


__________________
My husband lets me have all the scrapbooking supplies I can hide. ~Author Unknown


sharon

Registered:
Posts: 7,051
Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janis

I haven't seen them, but they sound YUM, YUM, YUM!

Janis

 OK gang, I have my new tin can of General Food Int'l. suisse Mocha - sugar free Naturally decaffeinated - in front of me -

serv size 1 1/3 tbsp

calories 30

total fat 2g

sodium 30mg

total carb 2g

exchange: 1/2 fat based on exchange lists for meal planning 2003 by the ADA and the Am. Dietetic Assoc.

I think that is pretty good and tastes YUMMMY!  This comes is 4-5 flavors but suisse mocha is all Fry's had at the time.  But, it is good!   LUM

CLINK! CLINK! CLINK!   FUN AND LAUGHTER - Sharon


__________________
Sharon from Arizona
Pumping with humalog since August, 2009
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply


Create your own forum with Website Toolbox!